Home Forums Protect US Workers Forum & Stories NO Background Checks are done on Companies like IT Cognizant and all other India

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    Federal government has TO TAKE measures FOR COMPANY LIKE 7-ELEVEN.

    SEE THIS LAWSIUT – https://www.pacermonitor.com/public/case/9075339/Thawar_v_7Eleven_Inc

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    https://www.pacermonitor.com/public/case/9075339/Thawar_v_7Eleven_Inc

    and read this : http://www.esrcheck.com/file/The-Dangers-of-Offshoring-Personally-Identifiable-Information-PII-Outside-of-United%20States.pdf

    and more info: On March 19, 2009, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) broke the dramatic story about its undercover investigation into identity theft from a call center in India. According the to the story, a criminal gang selling UK credit card details stolen from Indian call centers has been exposed by an undercover BBC News investigation. Reporters posing as fraudsters bought UK names, addresses and valid credit card details from a Delhi-based man. The undercover investigators were able to purchase the credit data for $10 a card. It appeared that the data was stolen as a result of UK residents purchasing products from a call center processing sales for the large IT firm Symantec. The story is at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7953401.stm. After the story broke, Symantec notified authorities in the U.K., the U.S. and Puerto Rico that the credit card information of around 200 of its customers might have been compromised. Symantec indicted that evidence pointed to a single call center representative. http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/1014/symantec-admits-card-data-probably-leakedfrom-india/. This story underscores that once personally identifiable information (PII) leaves the U.S., consumers are at potential risk. In this case, but for the extraordinary efforts of undercover journalists from the BBC, the violations of personal privacy may never have surfaced and individual consumers would not have known how their card was breached, or how to deal with it. Of course, call center breaches can occur in the United States as well, but if it does, there are resources and recourses for consumers. When data is stolen offshore, consumers may never know where the problem occurred. In addition, how could a U.S. consumer, as a practical matter, call a foreign police department to ask for help?

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    H1B Visa program are surely being abused for many years.

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    According to the American Transcription Association (ATA), “offshoring” in terms of transcription is the act of subcontracting transcription to workers outside of the United States, and the ATA is against offshoring for two main reasons:  Sending personal information outside of the country can lead to unsecured transfer of personal data and even information and identity theft; and  Offshoring work means U.S.-based transcriptionists are losing jobs.

    The ATA is not comfortable with personal medical, financial, legal, and other personal information of Americans being on computers in a foreign country, and does not think that many Americans would feel comfortable either. The ATA is not convinced that the full confidentiality required when handling these documents can be reasonably enforced when the work is offshored.

    Medical transcriptionists in the U.S. are bound by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which protects the privacy of your medical records and sets strict standards for secure handling, transfer, and storage of files. However, U.S. law does not apply in foreign countries where many companies offshore their transcription work. Some organizations may not even realize that the records of their clients or patients are leaving the country if they subcontract their work to an American transcription company and assumed all work will be done in the U.S., which is not always the case.

    Although there has been talk at state and federal levels of implementing new Acts or amending current ones regarding offshoring, there are no current U.S. laws that explicitly prevent companies from offshoring personal information. As a result, documented cases of offshore transcriptionists who have threatened to disclose personally identifying information from medical records – which would have been a breach of HIPAA – face little chance of being extradited and brought to justice in America, making foreign transcriptionists immune to prosecution for all intents and purposes.

    While offshoring transcription work can be cheaper because wages are so much lower in some foreign countries than in the U.S., the ATA believes personal and sensitive information “should not be handled by the lowest bidder” and serious privacy, confidentiality, and security issues need to be addressed. Find out more about offshoring at the American Transcription Association (ATA) website at: http://www.ataus.org.
    ConcernedCRAs

    for more read this http://www.esrcheck.com/file/The-Dangers-of-Offshoring-Personally-Identifiable-Information-PII-Outside-of-United%20States.pdf

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    hen a United States resident applies for a job, they are likely to undergo a pre-employment background check. A disclosure and consent form required by law is completed by the applicant where they provide among other things their name, date of birth, and Social Security number (“SSN”) — in other words, everything needed for identity theft. What job applicants do not know is that there is a substantial likelihood that their Personally Identifiable Information (“PII”) will end up outside the U.S. and its territories in a foreign call center or data processing location well beyond the protection of U.S. privacy laws through the process known as “offshoring” The practice of offshoring provides virtually no protection against identity theft.

    It is not relevant where a firm’s servers are located. If an offshore worker is able to access PII, then the potential for Identity Theft exists. Nor is the formal legal relationship between the U.S. firm and the offshore worker relevant in the least. It does not matter if the offshore worker is an employee of the American firm, an employee of some legal subsidiary, an employee of a firm hired by the U.S. firm, or an independent contractor — once data goes offshore, U.S. legal protections vanish and there is strong historic evidence that there is a risk of Identity Theft.

    Of course, Identity Theft can occur inside the U.S. as well. The big difference? In the U.S. there are laws and protections in place to allow victims of Identity Theft to not only avail themselves of legal protection, but to more easily discover the cause of the theft and take appropriate legal actions. For example, data breach laws throughout the U.S are a strong protection against Identity Theft, and those have no impact once PII goes offshore. (Note: It is beyond the scope of this Whitepaper to review the protections and remedies afforded to U.S. residents in the event of Identify Theft or Data Breach in the U.S.). However, an outstanding compilation of resources and remedies available for victims of Identity Theft in the U.S. has been assembled by Privacy Rights Clearinghouse at: http://www.privacyrights.org/Id

    Profile photo of pretty Womenpretty Women
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    hen a United States resident applies for a job, they are likely to undergo a pre-employment background check. A disclosure and consent form required by law is completed by the applicant where they provide among other things their name, date of birth, and Social Security number (“SSN”) — in other words, everything needed for identity theft. What job applicants do not know is that there is a substantial likelihood that their Personally Identifiable Information (“PII”) will end up outside the U.S. and its territories in a foreign call center or data processing location well beyond the protection of U.S. privacy laws through the process known as “offshoring” The practice of offshoring provides virtually no protection against identity theft.

    It is not relevant where a firm’s servers are located. If an offshore worker is able to access PII, then the potential for Identity Theft exists. Nor is the formal legal relationship between the U.S. firm and the offshore worker relevant in the least. It does not matter if the offshore worker is an employee of the American firm, an employee of some legal subsidiary, an employee of a firm hired by the U.S. firm, or an independent contractor — once data goes offshore, U.S. legal protections vanish and there is strong historic evidence that there is a risk of Identity Theft.

    Of course, Identity Theft can occur inside the U.S. as well. The big difference? In the U.S. there are laws and protections in place to allow victims of Identity Theft to not only avail themselves of legal protection, but to more easily discover the cause of the theft and take appropriate legal actions. For example, data breach laws throughout the U.S are a strong protection against Identity Theft, and those have no impact once PII goes offshore. (Note: It is beyond the scope of this Whitepaper to review the protections and remedies afforded to U.S. residents in the event of Identify Theft or Data Breach in the U.S.). However, an outstanding compilation of resources and remedies available for victims of Identity Theft in the U.S. has been assembled by Privacy Rights Clearinghouse at: http://www.privacyrights.org/Id

    read this : http://www.esrcheck.com/file/The-Dangers-of-Offshoring-Personally-Identifiable-Information-PII-Outside-of-United%20States.pdf

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    Dangers of Offshoring
    Quality of Work

    In addition to the potential of privacy violations and Identity Theft, the issue of quality of work requires emphasis since “offshore” means outside of the normal quality control ability of a U.S. firm. In background screening, cultural knowledge is necessary. For example, most people in the U.S. would know that “UCLA” stands for “University of California, Los Angeles” if verifying an applicant’s education. A person outside of the U.S. could well struggle with that simple term. Even more troubling is the opportunity for error on a criminal background check given the wide variety of screening industry specific terms relating to criminal charges and dispositions that vary from state to state, not to mention the numerous restrictions on what may be reported by the screening firm and what information may be ultimately be considered for employment purposes.
    Home Workers

    Another issue related to offshoring would be “home workers,” some of whom would fall under the category of “offshore workers” as well. Even where a home worker is in the U.S. any PII put into their hands loses most, if not all, of the protections it would have in a business facility with requisite access controls along with physical and technical security protocols. Employers dealing with home workers handling part of their screening work may have to deal with issues of professionalism, training, quality control, and reliability. This is not to suggest that all home workers are not perfectly capable workers, but must be examined carefully given the sensitive nature of the work and privacy issues.
    Offshoring Data Breaches and Data Breach Concerns

    The dangers of offshoring have been demonstrated over the past few years in a number of news stories, investigations, and studies, some of which are included bel

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    http://www.esrcBBC Investigation Reveals Personal Identifiable Information Sold from Offshore Call Center:

    On March 19, 2009, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) broke the dramatic story about its undercover investigation into identity theft from a call center in India. According the to the story, a criminal gang selling UK credit card details stolen from Indian call centers has been exposed by an undercover BBC News investigation. Reporters posing as fraudsters bought UK names, addresses and valid credit card details from a Delhi-based man. The undercover investigators were able to purchase the credit data for $10 a card. It appeared that the data was stolen as a result of UK residents purchasing products from a call center processing sales for the large IT firm Symantec. The story is at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7953401.stm. After the story broke, Symantec notified authorities in the U.K., the U.S. and Puerto Rico that the credit card information of around 200 of its customers might have been compromised. Symantec indicted that evidence pointed to a single call center representative. http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/1014/symantec-admits-card-data-probably-leakedfrom-india/. This story underscores that once personally identifiable information (PII) leaves the U.S., consumers are at potential risk. In this case, but for the extraordinary efforts of undercover journalists from the BBC, the violations of personal privacy may never have surfaced and individual consumers would not have known how their card was breached, or how to deal with it. Of course, call center breaches can occur in the United States as well, but if it does, there are resources and recourses for consumers. When data is stolen offshore, consumers may never know where the problem occurred. In addition, how could a U.S. consumer, as a practical matter, call a foreign police department to ask for help? Investigation into stolen identities in India:

    An undercover TV investigation claims to have infiltrated criminal gangs selling thousands of UK credit card and passport details for as little as £5 each from the country’s offshore call centers. The Channel 4 Dispatches documentary follows a 12-month investigation that resulted in footage of middlemen offering the undercover reporter credit card details of 100,000 customers of UK high-street banks from Indian call centers. For more information, see: http://services.silicon.com/offshoring/0,3800004877,39163025,00.htm.

    Indian call center staff nicked for fraud:

    Three workers from an Indian call center have been arrested for defrauding US bank customers. In total twelve people have been arrested for cheating Citibank customers out of $350,000. Three of the men worked for Mphasis, an offshoring firm which runs call centers in Bangalore and Pune. They are accused of charming PIN numbers out of customers and using them to transfer funds illegally, according to the Associated Press (AP). Customers noticed the dodgy transfers and complained to Citibank, which traced the problem back to Pune. Bank officials then contacted the police. There have been concerns that offshoring business services increases the danger of fraud. The fact that this scam relied on old school social hacking — getting customers to tell you their PIN number — may reassure some. The team was in the process of transferring another raft of funds when they were arrested by Pune’s Cyber Crime unit. The men have been remanded in custody until April 11. For more information about this story, see: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/11/india_callcentre_fraud_arrests/.

    ESR Whitepaper – The Dangers of Offshoring PII Page 4 of 13

    © Copyright 2012 Employment Screening Resources
    Recent undercover ‘sting’ operations reveal how easy it is to purchase customer information from call center:

    Indian call centers know that overseas clients are not entirely comfortable with customer data being processed offshore, so they stop at nothing to give a warm, safe feeling. Further down the food chain the contact centers may not be as reputable or as well managed but then it’s the responsibility of the mobile phone companies using the contact center service to protect their customer information – so they should only be dealing with trusted partners anyway. See: http://services.silicon.com/offshoring/0,3800004877,39163049,00.htm.

    Indian call centers accused of selling Britons’ personal data for as little as two pence:

    In March 2012, an undercover investigation discovered Indian call centers selling Britons’ confidential personal data – including credit card information, medical and financial records – to criminals and marketing firms for as little as two pence. Two ‘consultants’ who claimed to be IT workers at several call centers boasted to undercover reporters of possessing personal information on nearly 500,000 Britons. The information was related to customers at major British financial companies and would allow criminals to syphon thousands of pounds from bank accounts in minutes. See: http://in.news.yahoo.com/indian-call-centres-accused-selling-britonspersonal-data-045625037.html.
    Offshoring IT Jobs Leads to Dramatic Increases in Data Breaches

    Sending heck.com/file/The-Dangers-of-Offshoring-Personally-Identifiable-Information-PII-Outside-of-United%20States.pdf

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    Offshoring IT Jobs Leads to Dramatic Increases in Data Breaches

    Sending Information Technology (IT) jobs abroad can help cut costs, but it can also increase security risks. A survey of 350 IT Managers quoted in Security Management Magazine demonstrates the risk to privacy and data protection when it comes to “offshoring.” According to the survey conducted by Amplitude Research, 69 percent of all respondents said they thought outsourcing decreased network security while about half of IT managers working for companies that outsourced IT jobs to other countries said their security had been negatively impacted, and 61 percent said their company had experienced a data breach. The study noted data breaches occurred in just 35 percent of the companies that do not send IT jobs outside of the U.S. See: http://www.securitymanagement.com/article/outsourcing-risk-006564.

    This survey naturally raises questions as to the safety of sending Personally Identifiable Information (PII) of American job applicants off shore in order to prepare background checks. The bottom-line: Before selecting a background screening firm, employers should determine if that firm is processing information outside of the U.S. The risk is significant, even if the offshore facility is wholly owned or a subsidiary of a U.S. firm. An employer needs to have a full understanding of how data and privacy is protected once it leaves the U.S., and what duty is owed to job applicants in terms of notice that their data is going abroad.

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    replacing US workers educated worker with (fake IT indian lying on there resume about there education)
    paying below the prevailing wages to fake IT Indians – and surely helps indidan company with tax fraud.
    smuggling and employing undocumented immigrants

    Top 10 companies that abuse H1B Visa program, hires un-documented people, along with hiring fake IT people, as result to liars putting fake education and work experience on their resume.
    Tata Consultancy Services, Infosys, Wipro, Cognizant and many more.
    Here are the links of Fraud Company that are: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Indian_IT_companies

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    Information technology workers at Southern California Edison (SCE) are being laid off and replaced by workers from India. Some employees are training their H-1B visa holding replacements, and many have already lost their jobs. …SCE, Southern California’s largest utility, has confirmed the layoffs and the hiring of Infosys, based in Bangalore, and Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) in Mumbai. (Southern California Edison IT workers ‘beyond furious’ over H-1B replacements)

    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    STOP H1B VISA.
    and stop L visas

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