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    https://www.justice.gov/usao-edtx/pr/indian-corporation-pays-record-amount-settle-allegations-systemic-visa-fraud-and-abuse

    Indian Corporation Pays Record Amount To Settle Allegations Of Systemic Visa Fraud And Abuse Of Immigration Processes
    Department of Justice
    Office of Public Affairs
      PLANO, Texas – Infosys Corporation, an Indian company involved in consulting, technology, and outsourcing, has agreed to a civil settlement of allegations of systemic visa fraud and abuse of immigration processes by paying a record settlement amount and agreeing to enhanced corporate compliance measures, announced U.S. Attorney John M. Bales.  The $34 million payment made by Infosys as a result of these allegations represents the largest payment ever levied in an immigration case.
            Infosys is located in thirty countries including the United States, and in 17 cities in the United States, including a location in Plano, Texas.  The Plano location is responsible for handling the immigration practices and procedures for the United States operations of Infosys.  Infosys brings foreign nationals into the United States in order to perform work and fulfill contracts with its customers under two visa classification programs relevant to this matter, H-1B and B-1.
            According to court documents, the government alleged instances of Infosys circumventing the requirements, limitations, and governmental oversight of the H-1B visa program by knowingly and unlawfully using B-1 visa holders to perform skilled labor in order to fill positions in the United States for employment that would otherwise be performed by United States citizens or require legitimate H-1B visa holders.  The government also alleges that Infosys did so in order to increase profits, minimize costs of securing visas, increase flexibility of employee movement, obtain an unfair advantage over competitors, and avoid tax liabilities.  Specific allegations include the following:
    ·       Infosys used B-1 visa holders to perform jobs that involved skilled labor that were instead required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders.
    ·       Infosys submitted “invitation letters” to U.S. Consular Officials that contained false statements regarding the true purpose of a B-1 visa holder’s travel in order to deceive U.S. Consular Officials and secure entry of the visa holder into the United States.  These letters often stated that the purpose of travel was for “meetings” or “discussions” when the true purpose was to engage in activities not authorized under a B-1 visa.
    ·       Infosys directed B-1 visa holders to deceive U.S. Consular Officials, including specific instructions to avoid certain terminology, to secure entry of the visa holder into the United States.  Infosys created a “Do’s and Don’ts” memorandum that it provided to foreign nationals entering the United States on a B-1 visa that included the following directions: “Do not mention activities like implementation, design & testing, consulting, etc., which sound like work”; “Also do not use words like, work, activity, etc., in the invitation letter”; and “Please do not mention anything about contract rates.”
    ·       Infosys told its foreign nationals to inform U.S. Consular Officials that their destination in the United States was the same as that provided in the Labor Condition Application, notwithstanding the fact that Infosys knew that the destinations had changed.
    ·        Infosys wrote and revised contracts with clients in order to conceal the fact that Infosys was providing B-1 visa holders to perform jobs that involved skilled or unskilled labor that were otherwise required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders.
    ·       Infosys concealed the fact that B-1 visa holders were performing jobs that involved skilled or unskilled labor that were otherwise required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders by billing clients for the use of off-shore resources when, in fact, work was being performed by B-1 visa holders in the United States.
    ·       Infosys failed to maintain I-9 records for many of its foreign nationals in the United States in 2010 and 2011 as required by law, including a widespread failure to update and re-verify the employment authorization status of a large percentage of its foreign national employees.
            The settlement agreement requires Infosys to make a payment to the United States of $34 million.  The agreement was largely predicated on Infosys’s cooperation with the United States during the investigation and on compliance measures taken by Infosys in the areas of B-1 and H-1B visas and I-9 documentation, both prior to and during the course of the investigation.  The settlement agreement requires additional auditing for I-9 forms; a reporting requirement for B-1 usage; an agreement to continue to use only detailed invitation letters, and the continued use of corporate disciplinary processes for employees that violate the immigration laws of the United States.
            “We will not tolerate actions that mislead the United States and circumvent lawful immigration processes, whether undertaken by a single individual or one of the largest corporations in the world,” said U.S. Attorney Bales.  “The H-1B and B-1 visa programs are designed and intended to protect the American worker; and we will vigorously enforce the requirements of those programs.”
    David M. Marwell, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Dallas, concurred:  “This settlement against Infosys is the largest immigration fine on record.  The investigation indicated that Infosys manipulated the visa process and circumvented the requirements, limitations, and governmental oversight of the visa programs.  The investigation also showed that more than 80 percent of Infosys’s I-9 forms for 2010 and 2011 contained substantive violations.  Ultimately, these actions by Infosys cost American jobs and simultaneously financially hurt companies that sought to follow the laws of this nation.  Companies that misuse the visa process can expect to be scrutinized and held accountable.”
            The investigation and settlement also earned the praise of George M. Nutwell III, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Houston Field Office, Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Department of State, who said that “the Infosys investigation illustrates the unique role that DSS plays in investigating complex visa fraud cases that reach far beyond U.S. borders.  DSS collaborates with our law enforcement partners and is committed to investigating and bringing to justice those who violate the law.”
            This case was investigated and the settlement negotiated by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Shamoil T. Shipchandler, Alan R. Jackson, and J. Kevin McClendon, and special agents and attorneys from the Department of State, Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

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    Indian Corporation Pays Record Amount To Settle Allegations Of Systemic Visa Fraud And Abuse Of Immigration Processes
    Department of Justice
    Office of Public Affairs
      PLANO, Texas – Infosys Corporation, an Indian company involved in consulting, technology, and outsourcing, has agreed to a civil settlement of allegations of systemic visa fraud and abuse of immigration processes by paying a record settlement amount and agreeing to enhanced corporate compliance measures, announced U.S. Attorney John M. Bales.  The $34 million payment made by Infosys as a result of these allegations represents the largest payment ever levied in an immigration case.
            Infosys is located in thirty countries including the United States, and in 17 cities in the United States, including a location in Plano, Texas.  The Plano location is responsible for handling the immigration practices and procedures for the United States operations of Infosys.  Infosys brings foreign nationals into the United States in order to perform work and fulfill contracts with its customers under two visa classification programs relevant to this matter, H-1B and B-1.
            According to court documents, the government alleged instances of Infosys circumventing the requirements, limitations, and governmental oversight of the H-1B visa program by knowingly and unlawfully using B-1 visa holders to perform skilled labor in order to fill positions in the United States for employment that would otherwise be performed by United States citizens or require legitimate H-1B visa holders.  The government also alleges that Infosys did so in order to increase profits, minimize costs of securing visas, increase flexibility of employee movement, obtain an unfair advantage over competitors, and avoid tax liabilities.  Specific allegations include the following:
    ·       Infosys used B-1 visa holders to perform jobs that involved skilled labor that were instead required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders.
    ·       Infosys submitted “invitation letters” to U.S. Consular Officials that contained false statements regarding the true purpose of a B-1 visa holder’s travel in order to deceive U.S. Consular Officials and secure entry of the visa holder into the United States.  These letters often stated that the purpose of travel was for “meetings” or “discussions” when the true purpose was to engage in activities not authorized under a B-1 visa.
    ·       Infosys directed B-1 visa holders to deceive U.S. Consular Officials, including specific instructions to avoid certain terminology, to secure entry of the visa holder into the United States.  Infosys created a “Do’s and Don’ts” memorandum that it provided to foreign nationals entering the United States on a B-1 visa that included the following directions: “Do not mention activities like implementation, design & testing, consulting, etc., which sound like work”; “Also do not use words like, work, activity, etc., in the invitation letter”; and “Please do not mention anything about contract rates.”
    ·       Infosys told its foreign nationals to inform U.S. Consular Officials that their destination in the United States was the same as that provided in the Labor Condition Application, notwithstanding the fact that Infosys knew that the destinations had changed.
    ·        Infosys wrote and revised contracts with clients in order to conceal the fact that Infosys was providing B-1 visa holders to perform jobs that involved skilled or unskilled labor that were otherwise required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders.
    ·       Infosys concealed the fact that B-1 visa holders were performing jobs that involved skilled or unskilled labor that were otherwise required to be performed by United States citizens or required legitimate H-1B visa holders by billing clients for the use of off-shore resources when, in fact, work was being performed by B-1 visa holders in the United States.
    ·       Infosys failed to maintain I-9 records for many of its foreign nationals in the United States in 2010 and 2011 as required by law, including a widespread failure to update and re-verify the employment authorization status of a large percentage of its foreign national employees.
            The settlement agreement requires Infosys to make a payment to the United States of $34 million.  The agreement was largely predicated on Infosys’s cooperation with the United States during the investigation and on compliance measures taken by Infosys in the areas of B-1 and H-1B visas and I-9 documentation, both prior to and during the course of the investigation.  The settlement agreement requires additional auditing for I-9 forms; a reporting requirement for B-1 usage; an agreement to continue to use only detailed invitation letters, and the continued use of corporate disciplinary processes for employees that violate the immigration laws of the United States.
            “We will not tolerate actions that mislead the United States and circumvent lawful immigration processes, whether undertaken by a single individual or one of the largest corporations in the world,” said U.S. Attorney Bales.  “The H-1B and B-1 visa programs are designed and intended to protect the American worker; and we will vigorously enforce the requirements of those programs.”
    David M. Marwell, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Dallas, concurred:  “This settlement against Infosys is the largest immigration fine on record.  The investigation indicated that Infosys manipulated the visa process and circumvented the requirements, limitations, and governmental oversight of the visa programs.  The investigation also showed that more than 80 percent of Infosys’s I-9 forms for 2010 and 2011 contained substantive violations.  Ultimately, these actions by Infosys cost American jobs and simultaneously financially hurt companies that sought to follow the laws of this nation.  Companies that misuse the visa process can expect to be scrutinized and held accountable.”
            The investigation and settlement also earned the praise of George M. Nutwell III, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Houston Field Office, Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Department of State, who said that “the Infosys investigation illustrates the unique role that DSS plays in investigating complex visa fraud cases that reach far beyond U.S. borders.  DSS collaborates with our law enforcement partners and is committed to investigating and bringing to justice those who violate the law.”
            This case was investigated and the settlement negotiated by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Shamoil T. Shipchandler, Alan R. Jackson, and J. Kevin McClendon, and special agents and attorneys from the Department of State, Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

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    Tuesday, April 5, 2016

    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/21-defendants-charged-fraudulently-enabling-hundreds-foreign-nationals-remain-united-states

    College
    “College” Created as Part of Homeland Security Investigations Sting Operation
    Twenty-one brokers, recruiters and employers from across the United States who allegedly conspired with more than 1,000 foreign nationals to fraudulently maintain student visas and obtain foreign worker visas through a “pay to stay” New Jersey college were arrested this morning by federal agents, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman for the District of New Jersey announced.
    The defendants (see chart below) were arrested in New Jersey and Washington by special agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and charged in 14 complaints with conspiracy to commit visa fraud, conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit and other offenses.  All the defendants, with the exception of Yanjun Lin aka Aimee Lin, 25, of Flushing, New York, will appear today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Steven C. Mannion of the District of New Jersey in Newark, New Jersey, federal court.  Lin will appear before U.S. Magistrate Judge Karen L. Strombom in the Western District of Washington federal court.
    “‘Pay to Stay’ schemes not only damage our perception of legitimate student and foreign worker visa programs, they also pose a very real threat to national security,” U.S. Attorney Fishman said.  “Today’s arrests, which were made possible by the great undercover work of our law enforcement partners, stopped 21 brokers, recruiters and employers across multiple states who recklessly exploited our immigration system for financial gain.”
    “While the United States fully supports international education, we will vigorously investigate those who seek to exploit the U.S. immigration system,” said Director Sarah R. Saldaña for ICE.  “As a result of this operation, HSI special agents have successfully identified and closed a gap in the student visa system and have arrested 21 individuals alleged to be amongst the system’s most egregious violators.”
    “Individuals engaged in schemes that would undermine the remarkable educational opportunities afforded to international students represent an affront to those who play by the rules,” said Special Agent in Charge Terence S. Opiola for ICE Homeland Security Investigations.  “These unscrupulous individuals undermine the integrity of the immigration system.  Our special agents are committed to addressing, identifying fraud in order to better protect the system as a whole.”
    According to the complaints unsealed today and statements made in court:           
    The defendants, many of whom operated recruiting companies for purported international students, were arrested for their involvement in an alleged scheme to enroll foreign nationals as students in the University of Northern New Jersey, a purported for-profit college located in Cranford, New Jersey (UNNJ).  Unbeknownst to the defendants and the foreign nationals they conspired with, however, the UNNJ was created in September 2013 by HSI federal agents.
    Through the UNNJ, undercover HSI agents investigated criminal activities associated with the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), including, but not limited to, student visa fraud and the harboring of aliens for profit.  The UNNJ was not staffed with instructors or educators, had no curriculum and conducted no actual classes or education activities.  The UNNJ operated solely as a storefront location with small offices staffed by federal agents posing as school administrators.
    UNNJ represented itself as a school that, among other things, was authorized to issue a document known as a “Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status – for Academic and Language Students,” commonly referred to as a Form I-20.  This document, which certifies that a foreign national has been accepted to a school and would be a full-time student, typically enables legitimate foreign students to obtain an F-1 student visa.  The F-1 student visa allows a foreign student to enter and/or remain in the United States while the student makes normal progress toward the completion of a full course of study in an SEVP accredited institution. 
    During the investigation, HSI special agents identified hundreds of foreign nationals, primarily from China and India, who previously entered the U.S. on F-1 non-immigrant student visas to attend other SEVP- accredited schools.  Through various recruiting companies and business entities located in New Jersey, California, Illinois, New York and Virginia, the defendants then enabled approximately 1,076 of these foreign individuals – all of whom were willing participants in the scheme – to fraudulently maintain their nonimmigrant status in the U.S. on the false pretense that they continued to participate in full courses of study at the UNNJ. 
    Acting as recruiters, the defendants solicited the involvement of UNNJ administrators to participate in the scheme.  During the course of their dealings with undercover agents, the defendants fully acknowledged that none of their foreign national clients would attend any actual courses, earn actual credits, or make academic progress toward an actual degree in a particular field of study.  Rather, the defendants facilitated the enrollment of their foreign national clients in UNNJ to fraudulently maintain student visa status, in exchange for kickbacks, or “commissions.”  The defendants also facilitated the creation of hundreds of false student records, including transcripts, attendance records and diplomas, which were purchased by their foreign national conspirators for the purpose of deceiving immigration authorities. 
    In other instances, the defendants used UNNJ to fraudulently obtain work authorization and work visas for hundreds of their clients.  By obtaining this authorization, a number of defendants were able to outsource their foreign national clients as full-time employees with numerous U.S.-based corporations, also in exchange for commission fees.  Other defendants devised phony IT projects that were purportedly to occur at the school.  These defendants then created and caused to be created false contracts, employment verification letters, transcripts and other documents.  The defendants then paid the undercover agents thousands of dollars to put the school’s letterhead on the sham documents, to sign the documents as school administrators and to otherwise go along with the scheme. 
    All of these bogus documents created the illusion that prospective foreign workers would be working at the school in some IT capacity or project.  The defendants then used these fictitious documents fraudulently to obtain labor certifications issued by the U.S. Secretary of Labor and then ultimately to petition the U.S. government to obtain H1-B visas for non-immigrants.  These fictitious documents were then submitted to the U.S. Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS).  In the vast majority of circumstances, the foreign worker visas were not issued because USCIS was advised of the ongoing undercover operation.
    In addition, starting today, HSI Newark is coordinating with the ICE Counterterrorism and Criminal Exploitation Unit (CTCEU) and the SEVP to terminate the nonimmigrant student status for the foreign nationals associated with UNNJ, and if applicable, administratively arrest and place them into removal proceedings.
    The chart below outlines the charges for each defendant.  The charges of conspiracy to commit visa fraud and making a false statement each carry a maximum potential penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.  The charges of conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit and H1-B Visa fraud each carry a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and $250,000 fine.
    The charges and allegations contained in the complaints are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.
    U.S. Attorney Fishman credited special agents of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, under the leadership of Director Saldaña; HSI Newark, under the leadership of Special Agent in Charge Opiola; U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Counterterrorism and Criminal Exploitation Unit, under the leadership of Unit Chief Robert Soria;  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Fraud Detection and National Security Section, under the leadership of Associate Director Matthew Emrich; the Student and Exchange Visitor Program, under the leadership of Deputy Assistant Director Louis M. Farrell; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Vermont Service Center, Security Fraud Division, under the leadership of Associate Center Director Bradley J. Brouillette; U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Office of Fraud Prevention Programs, under the leadership of Director Josh Glazeroff; and the FBI, Joint Terrorism Task Force, under the leadership of Timothy Gallagher in Newark, for their contributions to the investigation.
    He also thanked the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC), under the leadership of Executive Director Michale S. McComis, and the New Jersey Office of Higher Education, under the leadership of Secretary of Higher Education Rochelle R. Hendricks, for their assistance.  In addition, U.S. Attorney Fishman thanked the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission and the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles, as well as the U.S. Attorney’s Offices for the Central District of California, Eastern District of New York, Eastern District of Virginia, Southern District of New York, Central District of Illinois, Peoria Division, and the Northern District of Georgia for their help.
    The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dennis C. Carletta of the U.S. Attorney’s Office National Security Unit and Sarah Devlin of the Office’s Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Unit.
    Defendant Name
    Age
    Residence
    Charges
    Jun Shen aka Jeanette Shen
    32
    Levittown, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jiaming Wang aka Celine Wang,
    34
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Philip Junlin Li
     
    33
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Zitong Wen aka Kate Wen
    27
    Rowland Heights, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Chaun Kit Yuen aka Alvin Yuen
    24
    Rowland Heights, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Ting Zue aka Tiffany Xue
    28
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Yanjun Lin aka Aimee Lin
    25
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Zheng Zhang aka Vicky Zhang
    26
    New York, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Xue Yong Liu aka Jack Liu
    29
    New York, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Minglu Li aka Vivian Lee
    36
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jason Li aka Jason Liu aka Fen Lee
    43
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
    Tajesh Kodali
    44
    Edison, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jyoti Patel
    34
    Franklin Park, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Shahjadi M. Parvin aka Sarah Patel
    54
    Hackensack, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Narendra Singh Plaha
    44
    Hillsborough, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Sanjeev Sukhija
    35
    North Brunswick, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Harpreet Sachdeva
    26
    Somerset, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Avinash Shankar
    35
    Bloomington, Illinois
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Karthik Nimmala
    32
    Smyrna, Georgia
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Govardhan Dyavarashetty aka Vardhan Shetty
    35
    Avenel, New Jersey
    – H1-B Visa fraud
    – False statements
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Syed Qasim Abbas aka Qasim Reza aka Nayyer
    41
    Brooklyn, New York
    – H1-B Visa fraud
    – False statements
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     

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    Conspiracy to commit visa fraud

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    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/21-defendants-charged-fraudulently-enabling-hundreds-foreign-nationals-remain-united-states

    The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dennis C. Carletta of the U.S. Attorney’s Office National Security Unit and Sarah Devlin of the Office’s Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Unit.
    Defendant Name
    Age
    Residence
    Charges
    Jun Shen aka Jeanette Shen
    32
    Levittown, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jiaming Wang aka Celine Wang,
    34
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Philip Junlin Li
     
    33
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Zitong Wen aka Kate Wen
    27
    Rowland Heights, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Chaun Kit Yuen aka Alvin Yuen
    24
    Rowland Heights, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Ting Zue aka Tiffany Xue
    28
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Yanjun Lin aka Aimee Lin
    25
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Zheng Zhang aka Vicky Zhang
    26
    New York, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Xue Yong Liu aka Jack Liu
    29
    New York, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Minglu Li aka Vivian Lee
    36
    Los Angeles, California
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jason Li aka Jason Liu aka Fen Lee
    43
    Flushing, New York
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
    Tajesh Kodali
    44
    Edison, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Jyoti Patel
    34
    Franklin Park, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Shahjadi M. Parvin aka Sarah Patel
    54
    Hackensack, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Narendra Singh Plaha
    44
    Hillsborough, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Sanjeev Sukhija
    35
    North Brunswick, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Harpreet Sachdeva
    26
    Somerset, New Jersey
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Avinash Shankar
    35
    Bloomington, Illinois
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Karthik Nimmala
    32
    Smyrna, Georgia
    – Conspiracy to commit visa fraud
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Govardhan Dyavarashetty aka Vardhan Shetty
    35
    Avenel, New Jersey
    – H1-B Visa fraud
    – False statements
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     
    Syed Qasim Abbas aka Qasim Reza aka Nayyer
    41
    Brooklyn, New York
    – H1-B Visa fraud
    – False statements
    – Conspiracy to harbor aliens for profit
     

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    The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dennis C. Carletta of the U.S. Attorney’s Office National Security Unit and Sarah Devlin of the Office’s Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Unit

    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/21-defendants-charged-fraudulently-enabling-hundreds-foreign-nationals-remain-united-states

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    NJ Desis Arrested in Visa Fraud Sting New Jersey desis continue to make news for all the wrong reasons. … Tajesh Kodali (44), Edison (NJ)

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    News about Jyoti Patel Visa Fraud
    bing.com/news

    Indian American convicted for H-1B visa fraud
    americanbazaaronline.com · 7 days ago
    Indian American woman, Hiral Patel, is the latest in the federal net to admit visa fraud. The 34-year-old Patel pleaded guilty before US District Judge Kevin McNulty in …

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